Category Archives: Domestic violence

Assisting Victims of Intimate Partner Stalking

The US Office for Victims of Crime is hosting an online discussion on 9 January at 2pm (Eastern Time):

… in recognition of National Stalking Awareness Month, the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), in coordination with the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), will present a Web Forum discussion with Michelle Garcia on best practices for assisting victims of intimate partner stalking. Ms. Garcia is Director of the Stalking Resource Center at the National Center for Victims of Crime.

You can submit questions now via their forum or during the session on 9 January. More details here.

Summit on Violence and Abuse in Relationships

An APA summit on violence and abuse in relationships will be held February 28 – 29, 2008 in Bethesda, MD. According to the announcement:

Topics include Intimate Partner Violence, Child Maltreatment, Children Exposed to Violence and Abuse, Elder Abuse, Gender-Based Issues, Ethnic Minority, Cultural Issues, Substance Abuse, and related themes. The focus will be on What We Know, What We Need to Know, and Where Do We Need to Go with respect to Research, Intervention, and Prevention. The program will consist of a number of plenary speakers and break-out groups to discuss relevant topics.

Recent podcasts relevant to psychology and crime

MP3onred From the Leonard Lopate Show:

  • Are Sex Offender Laws Working? (20 December): “US sex offender laws may do harm than good, according to a recent report from Human Rights Watch. Strict notification laws and residency requirements don’t reflect the reality of the risks children face, may not protect victims, and violate the basic human rights of former offenders.”
  • Exonerated: Life After Wrongful Imprisonment (The Leonard Lopate Show: 19 December): “Barry Gibbs spent 19 years in prison for a murder he didn’t commit. David Shepard was wrongfully convicted of rape, and served 10 years of a 30-year sentence. Both were exonerated. But exoneration comes with its own set of challenges. Mr. Gibbs, Mr. Shepard, and Innocence Project attorney Vanessa Potkin explain why returning to the outside world is so difficult…and whether anything can make up for the years lost in prison.”
  • JFK’s Assassination, 44 Years Later (The Leonard Lopate Show: 23 November): “Today, 70 percent of Americans think Lee Harvey Oswald did not act alone. Robert Stone’s new documentary about JFK’s assassination, “Oswald’s Ghost,” reviews what happened on November 22, 1963 and how that day’s events have become mythologized in American society.”
  • The Art of Political Murder (The Leonard Lopate Show: 15 November): Bishop Juan Gerardi was a Guatemalan human rights leader who was killed after he published a report on Guatemala’s army-led genocidal campaign in the 1980s and 90s. Francisco Goldman’s account of what happened is The Art of Political Murder: Who Killed the Bishop?

A couple of videos via Sandra Kiume’s Channel N Blog:

  • Clinical Reality of Violence Against Women (Emory University Regional Training Center): “…understanding the dynamics of domestic violence by enhancing their response and intervention skills with patients who are victims of domestic violence.”
  • Adolescent Sex Offenders (Yale Psychiatry): “In a Yochelson Lecture, Roy O’Shaughnessy, M.D., Head, Division Forensic Psychiatry of the University of British Columbia (UBC) discusses the psychopathy, treatment and management of adolescent sex offenders. Interesting, and challenging to pop culture assumptions and values.”

From the BBC:

  • Assignment – The internet chatroom murder (22 November): “This week on Assignment, a story of lust, deception and betrayal on the internet. It tells the extraordinary story of a middle-aged factory worker who undergoes a virtual and very real transformation after he goes online – a transformation which ends in murder.”

And finally, over at The Psych Files:

  • The Effects of Video Game and Media Violence (7 December): “What do psychologists think about the effects of violent video games and violence in the media on viewers? Does it lead people to be more aggressive? More violent? Or is it the other way around?”

Essays on social justice and criminal justice

The Centre for Crime and Justice Studies at Kings College London has published a set of essays based on contributions and papers from a two day conference held by the Centre earlier this year.

This collection of essays from more than 20 researchers and academics highlights how the government has failed to tackle deep-rooted social injustice. Published as part of our Harm and Society project, the collection explores themes such as the impact of historically high levels of inequality, endemic violence against women and the increasing reliance on criminal justice measures to manage social problems.

Table of contents below the fold.

Reference:

Continue reading Essays on social justice and criminal justice

Healthcare providers reported to be failing to spot abuse

A sad story in the Observer (11 Nov) reports that healthcare providers are ‘failing to spot child abuse’:

Doctors and social workers are failing children who end up in hospital after abuse or neglect by their parents, a government-funded inquiry has found. Some are discharged from casualty departments and allowed to go home, despite suspicious injuries such as a black eye or broken arm, because they are not identified as being at risk, states a report by the National Children’s Bureau (NCB) charity.

Doctors and nurses say specialist social workers are overworked and often reluctant to intervene, even if it is thought children are likely to suffer further harm. Social workers, for their part, told researchers they were ‘frustrated with medical staff who were not prepared to make a decision about whether a child’s injury was accidental or not’ because they did not want to be the one that ‘labelled’ a family as abusive.

Earlier this month a new study in the Annals of Internal Medicine reported that in the US physicians and nurses “typically asked [women reporting to emergency departments] about domestic violence in a perfunctory manner”.

Although so often the emergency room is the first time that abuse – of intimate partners or of children – comes to the attention of the authorities, it seems that healthcare providers are poorly equipped to notice and to deal with it.

References:

Abstract below the fold.

Continue reading Healthcare providers reported to be failing to spot abuse

New issues: Journal of Criminal Justice

journals

Journal of Criminal Justice 35(4), July-August 2007 and Journal of Criminal Justice 35(5), September-October 2007 are now online. Follow the link to the publisher’s website for abstracts and access to full text articles.

Contents:

Journal of Criminal Justice 35(4):

  • Predicting crime story salience: A replication – Steven Chermak and Nicole M. Chapman
  • Duration of the time to reconviction: Evidence from UK prisoner discharge data – Roger Arthur Bowles and Chrisostomos Florackis
  • Convicting and incarcerating felony offenders of intimate assault and the odds of new assault charges – John Wooldredge
  • Roles of neighborhood race and status in the middle stages of juror selection – Ralph B. Taylor, Jerry H. Ratcliffe, Lillian Dote and Brian A. Lawton
  • Race and repeats: The impact of officer performance on racially biased policing – Lisa Growette Bostaph
  • Interpersonal violent crime in Ghana: The case of assault in Accra – Joseph Appiahene-Gyamfi
  • The long-term impact of restorative justice programming for juvenile offenders – Kathleen J. Bergseth and Jeffrey A. Bouffard
  • How does reactivity affect police behavior? Describing and quantifying the impact of reactivity as behavioral change in a large-scale observational study of police – Richard Spano

Journal of Criminal Justice 35(5):

  • Differentiating among racial/ethnic groups and its implications for understanding juvenile justice decision making – Michael J. Leiber, Joseph Johnson, Kristan Fox and Robyn Lacks
  • Prisonization and accounts of gun carrying – Paul B. Stretesky, Mark Pogrebin, N. Prabha Unnithan and Gerry Venor
  • Victims’ perceptions of police response to domestic violence incidents – Ida M. Johnson
  • Considering the efficacy of situational crime prevention in schools – Lauren O’Neill and Jean Marie McGloin
  • Citizen assessment of local criminal courts: Does fairness matter? – Kevin Buckler, Francis T. Cullen and James D. Unnever
  • Investigating the impact of extended bar closing times on police stops for DUI – Leana Allen Bouffard, Lindsey Ellen Bergeron and Jeffrey A. Bouffard
  • Operationalizing risk: The influence of measurement choice on the prevalence and correlates of prison violence among incarcerated murderers – Jon R. Sorensen and Mark D. Cunningham
  • Stalking acknowledgement and reporting among college women experiencing intrusive behaviors: Implications for the emergence of a “classic stalking case” – Carol E. Jordan, Pamela Wilcox and Adam J. Pritchard
  • A note on the status of discretion in police research – Ernest L. Nickels

New issue: The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice 46(4)

journals

The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice 46(4), September 2007 is now online. Follow the link to the publisher’s website for abstracts and access to full text articles.

Contents include:

  • Evaluating the Effectiveness of Professionally-Facilitated Volunteerism in the Community-Based Management of High-Risk Sexual Offenders: Part Two – A Comparison of Recidivism Rates – ROBIN J. WILSON, JANICE E. PICHECA, MICHELLE PRINZO
  • Individual Differences in Public Opinion about Youth Crime and Justice in Swansea – KEVIN HAINES, STEPHEN CASE
  • Improving the Civil-Criminal Interface for Victims of Domestic Violence – AMANDA L. ROBINSON
  • Deciding Upon Mode of Trial – STEVEN CAMMISS
  • Policing Anti-Social Behaviour: Constraints, Dilemmas and Opportunities – SARAH HODGKINSON, NICK TILLEY
  • Youth Justice, Social Exclusion and the Demise of Social Justice – PATRICIA GRAY
  • The Judiciary as a Primary Definer on Anti-Social Behaviour Orders – JANE DONOGHUE

New issue: Journal of Interpersonal Violence 22(11)

journals

The November 2007 issue of Journal of Interpersonal Violence 22(11) is now online. Follow the link to the publisher’s website for abstracts and access to full text articles.

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Contents include:

  • Assessing the Factors Associated With Sexual Harassment Among Young Female Migrant Workers in Nepal – Mahesh Puri and John Cleland
  • Parricide: An Empirical Analysis of 24 Years of U.S. Data – Kathleen M. Heide and Thomas A. Petee
  • Weapons Used by Juveniles and Adult Offenders in U.S. Parricide Cases – Kathleen M. Heide and Thomas A. Petee
  • Postdicting Arrests for Proactive and Reactive Aggression With the PICTS Proactive and Reactive Composite Scales – Glenn D. Walters, Alice A. Frederick, and Charles Schlauch
  • Acculturation Stress, Drinking, and Intimate Partner Violence Among Hispanic Couples in the U.S. – Raul Caetano, Suhasini Ramisetty-Mikler, Patrice A. Caetano Vaeth, and T. Robert Harris
  • An Analysis of Korean Homicide Crime-Scene Actions – C. Gabrielle Salfati and Jisun Park
  • Structural Validity of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist Among College Students With a Trauma History – Jon D. Elhai, Matt J. Gray, Anna R. Docherty, Todd B. Kashdan, and Samet Kose
  • Clinical Epidemiology of Urban Violence: Responding to Children Exposed to Violence in Ten Communities – Ilan Harpaz-Rotem, Robert A. Murphy, Steven Berkowitz, Steven Marans, and Robert A. Rosenheck

Articles of forensic interest in the July issue of the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry

journals

Some articles of forensic interest in the July 2007 issue of the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry 77(3) . Follow the link for access to abstracts and full text articles.

  • Posttraumatic Distress and Growth Among Wives of Prisoners of War: The Contribution of Husbands’ Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Wives’ Own Attachment – Rachel Dekel
  • Tomorrow’s Players Under Occupation: An Analysis of the Association of Political Violence With Psychological Functioning and Domestic Violence, Among Palestinian Youth – Alean Al-Krenawi, John R. Graham and Mahmud A. Sehwail
  • Do Urban Adolescents Become Desensitized to Community Violence? Data From a National Survey – Michael R. McCart, Daniel W. Smith, Benjamin E. Saunders, Dean G. Kilpatrick, Heidi Resnick and Kenneth J. Ruggiero
  • Children’s Self-Reports About Violence Exposure: An Examination of the Things I Have Seen and Heard Scale – Richard Thompson, Laura J. Proctor, Cindy Weisbart, Terri L. Lewis, Diana J. English, Jon M. Hussey and Desmond K. Runyan
  • Longitudinal Helpseeking Patterns Among Victims of Intimate Partner Violence: The Relationship Between Legal and Extralegal Services – Lauren Bennett Cattaneo, Jeffrey Stuewig, Lisa A. Goodman, Stacey Kaltman and Mary Ann Dutton
  • Adolescent Female Murderers: Characteristics and Treatment Implications – Dominique Roe-Sepowitz

Call for abstracts and conference announcement: Family Aggression: Causes & Consequences

The University of Central Lancashire is hosting a conference on Family Aggression: Causes & Consequences, organised by the International Family Aggression Society. The conference will take place on 18 and 19 March next year, in Preston (Lancs, UK).

The aim of this conference is to bring together academics, researchers, policy makers and service providers who are involved in working towards understanding, preventing and/or treating family aggression or the consequences of it. The focus of this conference is therefore broad and includes aggression between romantic partners, parent to child aggression, child to parent aggression, sibling aggression, elder aggression, and aggression to companion animals. As aggression within the family home contributes to physical and psychological injury, family breakdown, disrupted schooling and employment, antisocial behaviour and criminality, ill health and higher mortality papers on these topics are also encouraged. The multifaceted nature of family aggression highlights the need for a multidisciplinary approach and therefore papers from all disciplines are welcomed.

Keynote speakers will be Murray Straus, Richard Tremblay, David Farrington, and John Archer

The closing date for submission of abstracts is 31st October 2007.